food&wine RESTAURANT SCOUT

Don Churro Cafe

13905-B Metrotech Drive
Chantilly, VA 20151
703-378-1211
www.donchurrocafe.com

CUISINE Spanish/Tapas, Latin American, Sweets

PRICE Under $12

HOURS Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sunday.

DELIVERY No

TAKEOUT Yes

NVM AWARDS Best New Restaurant 2009

NEARBY METRO None

SPECIAL FEATURES

Accepts Credit Cards
Takeout
Reservations
Kids Menu
Dinner
Lunch
Breakfast Weekday
Breakfast Weekend



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NVM Review

(June 2010)

By Warren Rojas

Carrying home the FIFA World Cup trophy is every professional soccer player’s dream.

Starry-eyed restauratuer Wagner Garces, on the other hand, has made it his mission to try and accommodate the Metro-D.C. area’s entire Latin American viewership at Don Churro throughout the month-long tournament.

“This is part of our culture,” the native Ecuadorian says of his lifelong obsession with the international contest.

Don Churro plans to show as many games as possible—core constituencies to be catered to include: Chile, Paraguay, Uruguay, Spain, Honduras and the U.S.—splitting the broadcasts between a pull-down projection screen (reserved for “the most prominent” games of the day, according to Garces) and the twin plasmas (slotted to show the less in-demand matches) parked above the bar.

According to Garces, patrons sporting jerseys of still-in-the-hunt World Cup competitors will enjoy 10 percent off food orders (two jersey-clad fans per group required to claim the discount). Meanwhile, all guests will be treated to assorted drink specials (including cut-rate domestic and import beers, wines and cocktails) during the games.

Garces also plans to play up his international cuisine, a carte that embraces specialties from across Latin America and Spain. Seasoned beef and plump raisins give Chilean empanadas a sweet-savory punch. Lightly spiced huevos layered with thinly sliced potatoes make the tortilla Espanola completamente maravillosa. Ribbons of savory steak encircle the buttery-rich slab of smoky Gouda (bien hecho!) at the heart of the signature Barros Luco sandwich.

(June 2010)

By Warren Rojas

Carrying home the FIFA World Cup trophy is every professional soccer player’s dream.

Starry-eyed restauratuer Wagner Garces, on the other hand, has made it his mission to try and accommodate the Metro-D.C. area’s entire Latin American viewership at Don Churro throughout the month-long tournament.

“This is part of our culture,” the native Ecuadorian says of his lifelong obsession with the international contest.

Don Churro plans to show as many games as possible—core constituencies to be catered to include: Chile, Paraguay, Uruguay, Spain, Honduras and the U.S.—splitting the broadcasts between a pull-down projection screen (reserved for “the most prominent” games of the day, according to Garces) and the twin plasmas (slotted to show the less in-demand matches) parked above the bar.

According to Garces, patrons sporting jerseys of still-in-the-hunt World Cup competitors will enjoy 10 percent off food orders (two jersey-clad fans per group required to claim the discount). Meanwhile, all guests will be treated to assorted drink specials (including cut-rate domestic and import beers, wines and cocktails) during the games.

Garces also plans to play up his international cuisine, a carte that embraces specialties from across Latin America and Spain. Seasoned beef and plump raisins give Chilean empanadas a sweet-savory punch. Lightly spiced huevos layered with thinly sliced potatoes make the tortilla Espanola completamente maravillosa. Ribbons of savory steak encircle the buttery-rich slab of smoky Gouda (bien hecho!) at the heart of the signature Barros Luco sandwich.

(May 2009)

By Warren Rojas

Naming yourself after a sugary street food renowned the world over is a bold move. But Don Churro founder Fausto Garces and his brood (various children and at least one son-in-law have stakes in the restaurant) make good on the memorable pastry work.

Fausto loves to spin yarns about his native Ecuador, proudly displaying a striking painting of Quito, the mountain-ringed capital of his homeland, across the front of the shop.

While main dishes can be hit or miss (pique lo macho bows to aesthetics rather than beef; pollo saltado lacks personality), sugary splendor abounds.

Saltenas bearing sweet dough around a savory purse of ground beef and plump raisins moved one Bolivian compatriot to inquire if he could cart home a dozen (or so) to his family. Homemade churros piped full of manjar blanco (caramel-like filling cultivated from condensed milk) or gooey, delicious Nutella are sprinkled with powdered sugar for good measure.

Elsewhere, a thin skin of seductive passion fruit recasts ubiquitous cheesecake as an island favorite (tart fruit shakes up the dense, deli staple, sans all the syrup employed by others).

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