Tips to Get Your Pet’s Groom On

Getting your dog groomed can be a uneasy process for you and your pet. Megan Craig, a certified groomer at Affectionate Pet Care, offers her best tips for great grooming experience.

 

Photo courtesy of Mallinka1/shutterstock.com

By Janeé Williams

Getting your dog groomed can be a uneasy process for you and your pet. Your dog can become uncomfortable when a stranger tries to come near it’s body or face with a razor, stopping the grooming process all together. It is important as a pet owner that you know what you can do to make sure your dog has the best grooming experience possible. Megan Craig, a certified groomer at Affectionate Pet Care, offers her best tips for great grooming experience.

NVM: How can you prepare your dog for the grooming process?

Photo courtesy of affectionatepetcare.com

MC: “One way to prepare your dog for grooming is to familiarize them with some of the sensations they might experience during grooming. Something as simple as regularly touching your dog’s feet, face, and ears can go a long way. Another way is to exercise your dog by taking it for a walk or run, or by visiting a dog park or doggy daycare. This will help the dog be more relaxed and calm for grooming, making it a much more enjoyable process for the dog.”

NVM: What will my dogs first grooming experience be like?

MC: “Your dog’s first groom will probably just include a bath, nail trim, and a small amount of hair trimming, as well as some time getting used to the dryer. Depending on the comfort level of your dog, there may be no trimming involved, and the groomer may instead choose to hold the hair clippers next to the dog while the clippers are on, helping the dog get use to the sound of vibrations. The groomer may also try to do a small amount of trimming around the eyes and face of the dog in order to get the dog accustomed to having scissors around the face.”

NVM: What’s another way to help produce a stress-free environment for your dog?

MC: “Reduce the amount of matting that your dog has. To prevent matting, it is important that you brush both the top layer of your dog’s coat, as well as the hair closer to the skin. Keep in mind that certain dogs’ coats tend to develop mats more quickly than other dogs. Dogs such as Huskies and Shepherds, or any breed of dog that has a double coat, can have a lot of undercoat to brush out. To be sure that there is no matting developing, you can also run a comb through the dog’s hair. If you are unsure of which brushes and combs you should use, your groomer can give you suggestions on which would be best suited for your dog’s particular coat.”

NVM: How often should you get your dog groomed?

MC: “Most groomers suggest you have your dog groomed every 6-12 weeks, depending on your dog’s type of coat and your desired coat length. “

With these suggestions, you can ensure your dog will have the best grooming experience possible. Visit your local groomer and find out what is the best grooming experience for your dog.

Affectionate Pet Care
3851 Pickett Road
Fairfax, 22031 (703) 250-5233

 
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