Anemics: Eat this, not that

Gluten, calcium, tannin and phytate-rich foods could be making your iron deficiency symptoms worse.

Young people having a good farm dinner
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Are you experiencing exhaustion, headaches, spells of dizziness, and find yourself feeling cold in almost any setting? If so, you could be experiencing some of the side effects of anemia, a common iron deficiency issue.

Because people with anemia have the tendency to feel colder than others (as is explained further at Fergon.com), fall and winter’s chillier temperatures can make said symptoms feel all the more unbearable.

Most people already know that red meat, spinach, beets, eggs and honey are all high in iron, and that those with anemia should try to work these ingredients into their diet as frequently as possible.

What most people aren’t as familiar with: what not to eat.

Though conditions differ from patient to patient (and medical professionals should always be consulted before making any major dietary changes), according to Doctors Health Press, these are some anemic dieting don’ts:

Alcohol

For those with folate-deficiency anemia, the body is in short supply of folic acid, a B vitamin which assists in the creation of red blood cells. Alcohol can further complicate how folates are absorbed in the body, so those with this condition should modify (or in some cases completely put an end to) their drinking.

Calcium-rich Foods

Dairy products can inhibit iron absorption, so try to monitor and reduce your intake of milk, yogurt and cheese.

Gluten

Particularly for those that also have a gluten intolerance, eating pasta, wheat, barley, rye and oats can lead to intestinal wall damage. If damaged, both iron and folic acid will be unable to absorb properly.

Phytates

Brown rice, whole grain wheat, potatoes, beans and nuts are infused with phytic acid which can reduce iron absorption in the blood stream.

Tannins

Coffee, black tea, green tea, grapes, and wine can be classified as tannins, which also have a tendency to interfere with your body’s ability to absorb iron.

 

 

 

 

 

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